Tag: Willamette Valley Wine

Left Coast Cellars The Orchards Pinot Gris 2017

I have no catchy introduction for this Left Coast Cellars The Orchards Pinot Gris 2017 other than to say this is a legitimate expression of the Pinot Gris grape. I’ve had those that are, for lack of a better word, watery, those that are too fruity, others that are just bland. But here you have the subtlety of aromas, the delicacy of flavors, and that suggestion of texture that makes a white wine sing. Cheers Left Coast — Pinot Gris isn’t just palatable, it’s enjoyable.

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Left Coast Cellars 2017 Estate Rosé

I literally just read four separate articles in four separate (real) publications about rosé today. While some industry experts still call this pink wine thing a fad, others argue that it’s here to stay. The thing is, rosé is a style of winemaking — not a wine. And like all things, there is always a chance that it can go out of style. This may be true — eventually. Right now winemakers are doing interesting things with their grapes — varying skin contact time, using lesser-known varietals, creating some blends that are down right “old-world” and others that are undeniably “new-world.” There are so many styles, enough to suit all kinds of palates. So, whether or not the style stays popular in the mass market, rosé wine, itself, isn’t going anywhere. I think. I also think that this Left Coast Cellars 2017 Estate Rosé is worth a sip…so let’s dive in, shall we?

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Ghost Hill Cellars 2013 Pinot Noir Blanc

Pinot Noir Blanc kind of sounds like an oxymoron, right? How can a red wine be white? And, if it is, how much will it still taste like the well-known (and for me beloved) varietal? I had so many questions when I saw folks posting pics of this unique Pinot Noir winemaking method a few weeks ago — from various different producers, mind you. Well, it was John and Irene Ingersoll of  to the rescue once again to help satiate my curiosity…

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Nicolas Jay 2015 Pinot Noir

There’s something special about Pinot Noir from Oregon’s Willamette Valley. I can never put my finger on exactly what it is, though. The region spans from coastal-setting to mountain-scape, and you wouldn’t think it would be that different from our Northern Californian Wine Country. But perhaps it’s because most wineries are small, often family-run boutiques; maybe it’s because Oregon, on the whole, is quite a young wine-producing region, unblemished by age, wear, and tear; or it could be because the Willamette, like Burgundy is located at 45 degrees latitude and that’s just the Pinot Noir sweet spot.

Whatever it is, I find that some of the most refined (most Burgundian, if you will) American Pinot Noirs come from this little pocket of the New World.

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Illahe Vineyards Rosé of Tempranillo

Rosé of Tempranillo isn’t something I see a lot. And it’s nothing that Illahe Vineyards’s Ford family ever originally planned on making. The initial one-acre planting was a bit of an experiment. “Let’s see what else we can grow,” seems to be one of Lawrence Ford’s pioneering attributes. But as Bethany pointed out during our conversation, Tempranillo can be a hard grape to grow and maybe the unique Illahe location isn’t the most suitable for the funky fruit. Brad’s remedy? Pick the fruit early and make a rosé. Sounds like a plan…

(Please see my first article about Illahe Vineyards to catch up on the family and vineyard history.)

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